Gleaning in Pennsylvania

Gleaning in Pennsylvania focuses on Lancaster County. If you are in the Lancaster County area and are interested in gleaning, contact our area coordinator, John Mackley.

John has begun gleaning in the Harrisburg area because he believes in coordinating farmers and volunteers to feed the hungry. In January 2015, he wrote this letter to the LancasterOnline newspaper:

It’s time to help hungry families
Jan 28, 2015

One in seven U.S. households faces hunger. Even when families can scrape together enough money, a balanced and healthy diet is often beyond their reach.

We need to create hunger-free communities and improve the nutrition, health, economic security and well-being of low-income residents. Ensuring that every eligible person benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps) is core to hunger solutions.

The Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive Grant Program is a new competitive grant program within the Agriculture Act of 2014 (commonly known as the Farm Bill.) Its goal is to increase the purchase and consumption of fruits and vegetables among SNAP participants.

This double-up-style program makes it easier for low-income households to purchase and eat fresh fruits and vegetables while supporting family farmers and growing local economies.

There are food banks throughout the county, yet no Gleaning Network has ever been established. Our neighbor to the north, Lebanon County, has had a Gleaning Network serving a number of their food banks for well over 15 years.

Gleaning, a biblical practice to combat hunger, is thousands of years old. Hunger is an age-old problem which has devastating effects on those who suffer from it.

It’s time for the kind-hearted, caring, honest, good natured and faith-based citizens to start addressing hunger solutions for those less fortunate — children, senior citizens, people with disabilities and others truly in need of food.

Together, hunger and food-insecure homes are just two issues closely linked to earning potential and are components to poverty with direct links to educational failures.

John Mackley, Elizabethtown